Father and daughter who were both diagnosed with breast cancer fought disease side by side

“I felt terrible guilt for passing along this gene to my daughter and possibly to my grandchildren,” says male breast cancer survivor Arnaldo Silva

male breast cancer
Father and daughter Arnaldo and Vanessa Silva

Arnaldo and Vanessa Silva share a close father and daughter bond. They share lunch dates and outings – but unfortunately, they both share something else as well: breast cancer.

“As a man, it’s the last thing that you expect to hear you have when you go to the doctor,” Arnaldo, 67, a retired stationary fireman, tells People magazine, “but I’m proof that it happens. This year alone, 3,000 men will be diagnosed and 400 will die, which I find unacceptable.”

Arnaldo, who was diagnosed with Stage 2 breast cancer in January 2007 after he found a lump beneath his right nipple while showering, is grateful today that he saw a doctor and had a biopsy — not only because it saved his life, but his daughter’s as well. 

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Thousands are now living longer with advanced cancer

living longer with advanced cancer

Cancer charity reveals for the first time the number of people living several years with advanced cancer after being diagnosed at stage 4

There are thousands of people alive in England who have survived for several years with the most advanced stage of cancer, according to new research from Macmillan Cancer Support and Public Health England’s National Cancer Registration and Analysis Service.

The research, revealed yesterday (Nov 8) at the 2017 National Cancer Research Institute (NCRI) Conference in Liverpool, is based on data from England’s national cancer registry. It shows that at least 17,000 people have survived for two years or more after being diagnosed with stage 4 cancer – the stage at which the disease has already spread to at least one other part of their body.

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Little Jacob’s last Christmas wish: Young cancer patient asks strangers to send him Christmas cards

Jacob Thompson with a penguin Christmas card
Jacob Thompson, 9, with one of the Christmas cards he has been sent

A nine-year-old cancer patient has asked for cards for Christmas after his parents were told he had just weeks to live.

Little Jacob Thompson has been fighting Neuroblastoma, cancer that forms in nerve cells early on, since he was diagnosed at age 5. It has spread to his head and hip, and treatment was deemed unsuccessful.

His mother, Michelle Thompson Simard, wrote on a GoFundMe page that Jacob has been admitted to the Barbara Bush Children’s Hospital in Portland, Maine, “for the last time.”

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Image of heart-shaped cancer cells wins science photography prize

cancer cells photography

A researcher from Australia has taken home the title of best scientific photograph for her image showing cancerous cells, which she captured while studying the progression of breast cancer.

The BMC Research in Progress Photo Competition received submissions from around the world, such as Nepal, Iraq, China and Brazil.

The entries included images of flowers, birds, butterflies, a bear living in captivity, and diseases like Zika and Dengue being studied in a lab.

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Women with disabilities could be missing out on cancer screening

Women with disabilities that affected eyesight, mobility and the ability to take care of themselves were the least likely to take part in cancer screening

cancer screening

 

A study has found that people with disabilities are probably missing out on cancer screenings.

Women with disabilities are a third less likely to participate in breast cancer screening and a quarter less likely to take part in bowel cancer screening compared to women reporting no disabilities, according to a new paper published in the British Journal of Cancer by researchers from the University of Oxford.

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Live Better With teams up with award-winning cancer skincare line Lindi Skin

Lindi Skin was founded by Lindy Snider and has been created especially for cancer patients

lindi skin collection

Here at Live Better With, we’re constantly updating our product range as we’re always on the lookout for new things that have made a difference to the day-to-day life of someone living with cancer.

Today, we are oh so excited to announce that we are collaborating with award-winning American skincare brand, Lindi Skin.

Lindi Skin develops clinically-proven skin care products that soothe and relieve the effects of radiation, chemotherapy, and day-to-day wear resulting from cancer treatments. 

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Rapper Pitbull flies Puerto Rican cancer patients to US on private plane for treatment

Pitbull said it was the least he could do after being praised by Puerto Rico congresswoman Jenniffer Gonzalez

rapper pitbull offers private jet

US rapper Pitbull is sending his private plane to Puerto Rico so cancer patients can be brought over to US mainland for treatment.

Pitbull – real name Armando Christian Perez – generously offered aid to Puerto Rico after the devastation from Hurricane Maria wiped out power through the entire island.

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Scotland to host ‘Dragons Den-style’ contest to fund cancer research

Worldwide Cancer Research charity will decide how £4 million will be used

cancer research

A Dragon’s Den-style competition to find the next big cancer research project is taking place in Scotland’s capital this week.

Some of the world’s leading scientists are coming together on Thursday (Sept 28) in Edinburgh for the Scottish- based charity Worldwide Cancer Research (WCR), to decide the fate of £4 million raised by supporters.

The Scientific Advisory Committee – 24 eminent scientists in the field of cancer who volunteer their time – has scrutinised hundreds of proposals from top research institutions all over the world before settling on the best.

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More than 1.7 million people living with cancer in the UK are parents

Cancer charity reveals for the first time the estimated number of parents with cancer – and raises awareness of some of the challenges they could be facing

mother living with cancer

Over a million mums in the UK are living with cancer – and of those, around 100,000 have young or teenage children – according to new estimates released by Macmillan Cancer Support.

The charity is releasing the figures ahead of its World’s Biggest Coffee Morning fundraising event on Friday 29 September in a bid to raise awareness of the challenges that parents with cancer could be facing and urge them to get help.

Macmillan is concerned that parents across the UK are grappling with a range of issues that include breaking the news of their cancer to their children, being apart from them while they have treatment, and needing to pay extra childcare costs.

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Egg freezing may not delay chemo for breast cancer patients

A new technique could make egg freezing before treatment a quicker process for cancer patients

egg freezing before chemo

Women diagnosed with breast cancer who want to freeze their eggs and embryos before tumour treatment leads to infertility can do this without delaying the start of chemotherapy, a US study suggests.

Chemotherapy can cause infertility by damaging the ovaries and by triggering an early menopause in women of childbearing age.

Researchers focused on 89 women newly diagnosed with breast cancer who received counseling at a fertility clinic about a relatively new technique known as random-start ovarian stimulation.

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